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Special Collection: Working with Children Towards a Healthy & Non-Violent Future

Table of Contents:


Intention Behind this Collection | Back to top

This Special Collection provides a unique perspective on working with children (younger than 13 years of age), focusing on theories and strategies for raising respectful, non-violent people. Resources included here discuss child development and how to utilize this knowledge when implementing primary prevention strategies that foster healthy attitudes and behaviors. Acknowledging the reality that many of the children with whom we work may already have been victimized or exposed to violence, we include tools to support secondary prevention efforts that teach skills to enhance safety. Central to this collection is the belief that advocates working to end violence against women are committed to the safety and well being of all children, and wish to create social change by investing in the potential that children offer – the promise of a new generation of non-violent, respectful young people and adults who resist traditional social norms that perpetuate violence against women. Of course, this work needs to include a concentrated effort to attend to the safety and support needs of the caring, supportive adults in children's lives.

In working with children, we must remind ourselves of what it is like to be a child, to take ourselves back to those core memories that shaped our childhood and remember the feelings and sensations of that experience. One tool that every advocate has already is having had the very experience of childhood. We must not underestimate the value of this resource, and should apply it to our work, taking care to recognize and respect the uniqueness and diversity of our experiences.

In our busy lives, sometimes we forget that there are simple things we can do everyday to promote resiliency and healthy development in the children we encounter. This collection includes tips for doing just that.

Why is this important? | Back to top

Violence against women is a worldwide epidemic. In order to eventually stop violence against women, it is absolutely necessary to bring about social change through the implementation of successful prevention strategies. Among these, efforts targeting children are key. And while it is important to talk to children about making healthy choices, we must also acknowledge the reality that we live in a world where violence is all around us, and therefore have an obligation to also teach children about how to process, manage, and heal from such violence. For these reasons and others, prevention work with children should include primary, secondary, and tertiary strategies in order to be truly effective.

The rates at which children are victimized or exposed to violence are quite alarming. Research reveals that between 33%-66% of known sexual assault victims are ages 15 or younger (Population Reports: Ending Violence Against Women, 2000). The literature also indicates that 10%-20% of children are exposed to domestic violence annually in the United States (Carlson, 2000, Trauma, Violence, and Abuse). Many fear that these children are doomed to live as adult victims or perpetrators as described in the well-known generational "cycle of violence" theory, but we know that many demonstrate enormous resiliency given the presence of certain protective factors. While the detrimental effects of domestic and sexual violence on children has been clearly established through research studies and observation, "the positive results of increased awareness, education, prevention and intervention for children and youth are increasingly recognized and duplicated throughout the nation" (National Resource Center on Domestic Violence, 2002, Children Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence). Careful attention to prevention strategies can help ensure that the cycle of violence is interrupted, and perhaps eventually put to an end. For children who have lived with domestic or sexual violence, secondary and tertiary prevention approaches are ideal – those that provide immediate responses to intervene and deal with the short-term consequences after violence has occurred and attempt to prevent further victimization or exposure.

While many children live with violence, there are also many who do not. Their attitudes and behaviors towards violence are shaped by many social and environmental factors, and those who encounter such children have a unique opportunity to help them develop into healthy, respectful adults. This population of children and youth is ideal for primary prevention approaches – those that take place before violence has occurred to prevent initial perpetration or victimization.

When engaging in prevention work, particularly to change traditional social norms that reinforce and perpetuate violence against women, we must take into account that we are engaging both victimized and non-victimized children. In order to address the combined needs of both victimized and non-victimized children, this Special Collection includes primary prevention approaches in the section "Fostering Healthy Attitudes & Behaviors" and provides resources for secondary prevention strategies in the section "Teaching Skills to Enhance Safety."

NOTE: While it is not the focus of this collection, more information about the impact of victimization and exposure on children can be found at the bottom of this page.

Understanding Child Development | Back to top

The previous section of this collection underscores the importance of drawing on our own experience as former children in doing this work. Therefore, we must also expand our understanding of the experiences of children by learning about child development. Child development refers to the biological and psychological changes that occur in human beings between birth and adolescence, progressing from dependency to increasing autonomy. Although there are several models describing this progression, it is important to remember that children are individuals with varying levels of ability, and this must be taken into account in order to gain a fuller understanding of the experience of any one child.

Perhaps the most widely used and universally accepted model explaining the developmental tasks involved with the social and emotional development of people (from birth to death) is Erik Erikson’s Eight Stages of Development (1956). In this model, each developmental stage includes a major psychosocial crisis that the individual must resolve in order to move to the next stage as a socially and emotionally healthy individual. If crises are not overcome, pathology or developmental difficulty may result. A closer look at each stage reveals the ways in which our interactions with children can either help or hinder this process. A basic understanding of this and other theories explaining child development can enhance prevention efforts with children, in addition to increasing our knowledge about the impact of adverse experiences.

Note: Research is available on known theories of child development proposed by Sigmund Freud (psychosexual), Jean Piaget (cognitive), Lev Vygotsky (cultural-historical), John Bowbly (social), Lawrence Kohlberg (moral understanding), Urie Bronfenbrenner (ecological systems), and John B. Watson (behavioral). Although not all are covered below, most of what we know about child development has been drawn from one or more of these theories.

  • The Developmental Stages of Erik Erikson | HTML HTML (5 p.)
    by Arlene F. Harder, MA, MFT, Learning Place Online (2002)
    This article describes Erikson's 8 stages of human development from birth through death, describing "ego development outcomes" or developmental crises and strengths at each stage. Provides detail about developmental tasks and primary relationships.
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  • Child Development Fact Sheets
    by Adults & Children Together Against Violence
    This series of fact sheets describes skills to expect from children at different stages based on age. Includes mental skills, social skills, and tips for parents to promote healthy development and deal with challenging behavior.
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  • Developmental Assets
    by Search Institute (2005)
    These 40 developmental assets are concrete, common sense, positive experiences and qualities essential to raising successful young people - having the potential to influence choices children make and help them become caring, responsible adults.
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  • Healthy Minds: How the Brain, Body and Mind Grows from Birth to 3
    by Zero to Three & the American Academy of Pediatrics (2003) Series of age-specific handouts based on findings from the National Academy of Sciences that examined the research on child and brain development to establish what is known about the early years. Includes suggestions for nurturing healthy development.
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  • Interactive Milestones Chart | HTML HTML (1 p.)
    by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities
    Developed for National Autism Awareness Month, this growth chart describes expected milestones in how children play, learn, speak and act from children from age 1 through 5. The message is to learn the signs in order to help prevent developmental delay.
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  • Brain Development | PDF PDF (8 p.)
    by National Child Care Information Center (January 2007)
    This resource list includes national and State organizations with information on brain development to promote healthy growth among young children and publications describing research and its implications for parenting, programming, and policy.
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  • How Men and Children Affect Each Other's Development | HTML HTML (8 p.)
    by Kyle D. Pruett, M.D., Yale Child Study Center, Zero to Three Journal (August/September 1997)
    This article describes the impact of fathering on child development and the effects of caregiving on fathers, discussing characteristics of paternal care and the implications from research for programs and practice.
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  • The Impact of Exposure to Domestic Violence on Child Development | PDF PDF" target="_blank">PDF (4 p.)
    by Casey Keene, Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence (2006)
    Provides a detailed chart that illustrates the impact of exposure to domestic violence on 5 stages of child development as defined by Erikson. Describes general impact, specific signs/symptoms, and children's perspectives from infancy through adolescence.
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Fostering Healthy Attitudes & Behaviors | Back to top

The resources listed here include activities, tip sheets, handbooks, and other useful materials for promoting healthy attitudes and behaviors in children with regard to gender socialization, relationships, sexuality, and human rights. Working with children on these particular issues can help promote norms of non-violence and respect that may help to end violence against women.

Gender Socialization
  • Report of the APA Task Force on the Sexualization of Girls | PDF PDF (72 p.)
    by American Psychological Association (2010)
    This report examines and summarizes psychological theory, research, and clinical experience addressing the sexualization of girls.
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  • Early Gender Socialization | HTML HTML (2 p.)
    by UNICEF
    This brief article explains the term "gender socialization" as a process of learning cultural roles according to one's sex, and provides examples of ways in which these are incorporated through parental and societal expectations from boys and girls.
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  • Parental Influence on Children's Socialization to Gender Roles | HTML HTML (4 p.)
    by Susan D. Witt, University of Akron, Adolescence (Summer 1997)
    This article describes how the strongest influence on gender role development occurs within the family setting, suggesting that an androgynous gender role orientation may be more beneficial to children than teaching adaptation to binary gender roles.
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  • Pink or Blue – Exploring, Performing and Transforming Gender Socialization: A Selected Reading List | HTML HTML (1 p.)
    by Women’s Center Library/North Hall, UC Davis (January 2005)
    This select reading list includes books exploring gender socialization in U.S. culture.
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  • Our Trans Children, Fifth Edition | PDF PDF
    by Parents, Families & Friends of Lesbians & Gays (PFLAG)
    This book is an introduction to trans issues especially for parents. Contents include commonly asked questions, commonalities and differences between sexual orientation and gender identity, issues of transgendered youth, and transgender and the law.
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  • Early Childhood Development - Your Options - How Do I Know If My Child Is Transgender? | HTML HTML (4 p.)
    by Stephanie Brill and Caitlin Ryan, National Association of Social Workers (NASW)
    Addresses the questions: What Is transgender? Can a Child Be Transgender? What Makes a Child Transgender? Why Can’t My Child Be "Normal"? How Should I Respond? How Can I know If It’s a Phase? Where Do I Get Help, Support, and More Information?
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  • Is This Child Gay, Transgender, or Both? | HTML HTML (2 p.)
    by Courtney Sharp, Parents, Families & Friends of Lesbians & Gays (PFLAG)
    Discusses questions such as: What is the relationship between sexual orientation and gender identity? How does one determine if a child or teen is gay or transgender? Do parents of gays need to understand transgender issues?
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  • Raising Strong, Confident Girls | HTML HTML (4 p.)
    by Gina Shaw, WebMD
    "Girls today often face mixed messages about themselves. But proactive parents can empower their daughters to decipher those messages - and make good decisions."
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  • Ten Tips for Dads with Daughters | HTML HTML (2 p.)
    by Dads & Daughters
    This article offers suggestions for raising girls with respect, encouragement, and involvement while resisting and challenging traditional gender norms and expectations.
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  • She's Not Made of Porcelain | HTML HTML (2 p.)
    by Joe Kelly, Dads & Daughters
    "From the beginning, it's crucial that fathers nurture a daughter's image of her body as strong, healthy, capable, and active." Declaring that "a daughter is not a fragile vase," this article introduces strategies for raising healthy, strong girls.
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  • Raise Respectful Boys...Not Macho Men | PDF PDF (2 p.)
    by Claudia Liliana Campos, Hablemos en Confianza
    This article provides tips for parents and caretakers on how to resist traditional gender norms and raise healthier, happier sons and daughters. Specifically, the focus is on strategies for raising respectful boys.
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  • The Search for Masculinity | HTML HTML (2 p.)
    by PBS
    This series of articles suggests ways to shape positive masculinity in boys when they are surrounded by "rules" of boy life. "We should talk with boys about the reality of gender expectations, and help them brainstorm about how to negotiate this problem."
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  • The Costs of Male Training | HTML HTML (1 p.)
    by Paul Kivel, Futures Without Violence (2003-2007)
    This exercise is a way to explore experiences of violence and abuse with groups of young men based on traditional gender role expectations or norms.
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  • Power Chart | HTML HTML (2 p.)
    by Paul Kivel, Futures Without Violence (2003-2007)
    This exercise provides a way to think and talk about men’s different experiences of power and oppression and how these experiences relate to gender-based violence.
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  • Strongest Man You Know and Real Man | HTML HTML (3 p.)
    by Men Can Stop Rape, Futures Without Violence (2003-2007)
    This exercise is used to identify dominant traits that are associated with traditional notions of masculinity, in societies and oneself, and to recognize counterstories of masculinity and strength in your environment.
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  • The Gender Box / Act Like a Man | HTML HTML (4 p.)
    by Paul Kivel, Futures Without Violence (2003-2007)
    This exercise is used to open up discussions about gender roles and how they are enforced, and masculinities and their connections to violence.
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  • A Tool Box of Intervention Strategies | HTML HTML (3 p.)
    by Men Can Stop Rape, Futures Without Violence (2003-2007)
    This exercise develops a toolbox of strategies for challenging the dominant story of masculinity and to learn specific techniques for challenging peers’s attitudes and behaviors that support men’s violence against women.
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Healthy Relationships
  • RePlay: Finding Zoe 2.0 | HTML HTML
    by Metropolitan Action Committee on Violence Against Women and Children (METRAC)
    This online video game for youth ages 8-14 opens a dialogue about abuse, addresses the 'rumour mill' they experience, educates about healthy, respectful relationships, and teaches players about places they can go for help.
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  • Break the Silence: Stop the Violence | HTML HTML
    by CDC-TV, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) (August 2008)
    In this short video, parents talk with teens about developing healthy, respectful relationships before they start dating. The webpage includes other video resources around the topic of health matters.
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  • Break the Silence: Stop the Violence | HTML HTML
    by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (August 2008)
    In this podcast, parents talk with real teens before dating, stay involved in their lives, and role model to help young people develop healthy, respectful relationships.
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  • What’s So Important about Good Relationships? | PDF PDF (1 p.)
    by Adapted from Parlakian, P. and Seibel, N.L., Zero to Three (2002)
    This brief article describes the importance of relationships to human development thoughout the lifespan, noting: "nurturing, sensitive adult-child interactions are crucial for the development of trust, empathy, compassion, generosity, and conscience."
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  • A Parent's Handbook: How to Talk to Your Children About Developing Healthy Relationships | PDF PDF (8 p.)
    by Richard Gallagher, Liz Claiborne Women's Work
    Designed for parents of pre-teens, this booklet was developed as a tool to help parents lay the foundation for healthy decision-making patterns and relationships. Includes tips for "starting the dialogue," interactive quiz, and additional resources.
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  • Talk with Your Child | HTML HTML (3 p.)
    by Choose Respect Initiative
    This article offers tips, strategies, and resources for talking with your child about dating, forming friendships, and treating one another with respect.
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  • Tough Talk: What boys need to know about relationship abuse | PDF PDF (7 p.)
    by Liz Claiborne Inc.
    Created to help men start a conversation with the boys in their lives about developing and maintaining positive relationships, this booklet defines abuse, provides practical guidelines and tips for starting a dialogue, and lists additional resources.
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  • The Importance of Play in Promoting Healthy Child Development and Maintaining Strong Parent-Child Bonds | PDF PDF (10 p.)
    by Kenneth R. Ginsburg, American Academy of Pediatrics (2007)
    Report describes the healthy aspects of free and unstructured play, noting that it is essential for helping children reach important social, emotional, and cognitive developmental milestones as well as helping them manage stress and become resilient.
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  • Raising Sexually Healthy Youth: Rights. Respect. Responsibility & Parent-Child Communication | PDF PDF (19 p.)
    by Barbara Huberman, Advocates for Youth (2002)
    This article talks about the importance of parent-child communication and how parents who provide resources, express their feelings and values can raise youth who respect themselves and behave responsibly.
    + View Summary
  • Talk to your kids...before everyone else does | PDF PDF (44 p.)
    by Children Now and the Kaiser Family Foundation
    This booklet offers practical concrete tips and techniques for talking easily and openly with young children ages 8 to 12 about some tough issues: sex and relationships, HIV/AIDS, violence, drugs and alcohol.
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  • Children and Respect | PDF PDF (2 p.)
    by Marilyn Ellis, The University of Maine Cooperative Extension (2002)
    This fact sheet talks about respect and what the term means, providing examples of respectful and disrespectful behaviors. This fact sheet is intended for families and people who work with families.
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  • Promoting Positive Peer Social Interactions | PDF PDF (4 p.)
    by T. Bovey & P. Strain, Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning
    This Brief is designed to help teachers, parents, and other caregivers support young children’s social and emotional development. Includes examples that illustrate how practical strategies might be used in a variety of early childhood settings.
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  • Growing and Developing Healthy Relationships: Teaching Notes | PDF PDF (26 p.)
    by Departments of Health and Education of Western Australia, Curtin University’s Western Australian Centre for Health Promotion Research
    This resource includes curriculum support materials and developmentally appropriate activities to support teaching and learning in the Early Childhood, Middle Childhood and Early Adolescence phases of schooling for relationships education programs.
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  • Healthy Relationships Poster | PDF PDF (1 p.)
    by National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (2002)
    This poster describes characteristics of healthy relationships: fairness, trust, respect, support, honesty, responsibility, communication, shared freedom, equality, and non-violence. Includes message: "Hands are for holding."
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  • Relationship Rights & Responsibilities | PDF PDF (1 p.)
    by Alternatives to Fear
    This handout lists individual rights and responsibilities in dating relationships.
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  • Dater's Bill of Rights | PDF PDF (1 p.)
    by National Crime Prevention Council
    This one-page document lists individual rights within a dating relationship.
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  • Relationship Contract | PDF PDF (1 p.)
    by Safe Place
    This "contract" includes a list of questions to consider when defining the terms of a healthy dating relationship. Generates discussion about preferences and rights.
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  • The Coaching Boys into Men Brochure | PDF PDF (2 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence (2005)
    This brochure outlines tips for talking to all of the boys in your life about respect, honor, and responsibility, and why violence against women is wrong.
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  • The Coaching Boys into Men Playbook | PDF PDF (47 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence (2005)
    This tool helps coaches deliver a critical message to young men: Help end violence against women by treating everyone with the same honor and respect that they give their teammates. Includes information and strategies for promoting this positive message.
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  • Sample Lesson Plan | HTML HTML (2 p.)
    by Peace Games
    Peace First offers a snapshot of a lesson plan, teaching principles of teamwork, communication, and cooperation.
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Healthy Sexual Behavior & Touch
  • The Student’s Guide to Health: How Kids and Teens Can Keep Their Bodies Healthy | HTML HTML
    by NursingSchool.org
    This page contains facts about the human body and a number of resources that help youth learn more about health. Includes information about: functions of the body, practicing good hygiene, making healthy food choices, getting fit and healthy, alcohol and drugs, staying safe, and good mental health.
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  • Keeping Your Body Safe | PDF PDF (20 p.)
    by Louisiana Foundation Against Sexual Assault (2010)
    This coloring book is a companion to the Care*ageous Kids curriculum released by LAFASA in 2009. Presented by "Gator Goodfellow" and "Gater Goodheart.
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  • Raising Healthy Kids: Families Talk About Sexual Health, For Parents of Young Children | PDF PDF (15 p.)
    by Family Health Productions (2003)
    This guide provides parents and other caregivers with information and skills that can help them communicate more effectively with their children about sexual health.
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  • Raising Sexually Healthy Children and Adolescents: General Overview and Look at 'Normal Development' | HTML HTML (6 p.)
    by Deborah Armstrong Hickey, Darkness to Light (2004)
    This article discusses what many parents and caregivers are concerned about today when it comes to their children: how to reduce the risk of sexual violence and increase the likelihood that their children will disclose to them.
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  • Right from the Start: Guidelines for Sexuality Issues, Birth to Five Years | PDF PDF (76 p.)
    by Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States (SIECUS) (1998)
    These guidelines were developed as a resource for caregivers in childcare centers and preschools who are challenged with the many complicated issues concerning early childhood sexuality.
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  • Sexuality and Child Development | HTML HTML (2 p.)
    by Sexuality and U.ca (September 2006)
    This resource provides a basic knowledge of the development of sexuality from infancy to adolescence. For each age group, an introductory discussion of key points related to child sexual development is provided.
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  • Recognizing Healthy and Unhealthy Sexual Development in Children | HTML HTML (3 p.)
    by Phil Rich, Self Help Magazine (2002)
    This short article discusses the importance of parents and other caregivers to understand what is "normal" sexual development and behavior in children and teenagers, and which behaviors might signal that a child is a victim of sexual abuse.
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  • Being Physical: Healthy Touch and Affection | HTML HTML (2 p.)
    by Joe Kelly, Dads & Daughters
    Written by a father, this article describes the use of good touch in the parenting of girls to express affection, comfort, reassurance and playfulness.
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  • Families are Talking: Keeping Kids Sexually Safe | PDF PDF (4 p.)
    by Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States (SIECUS) (2004)
    This newsletter provides useful information for parents and caregivers when teaching their children the difference between "good" and "bad" touch and how to set boundaries to their own bodies.
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  • Raising Sexually Healthy Youth: Rights. Respect. Responsibility & Parent-Child Communication | PDF PDF (19 p.)
    by Barbara Huberman, Advocates for Youth (2002)
    This article talks about the importance of parent-child communication and how parents who provide resources, express their feelings and values can raise youth who respect themselves and behave responsibly.
    + View Summary
  • Proud Of Me! Activity book for encouraging a sexually healthy child (for girls) | PDF PDF (98 p.)
    by Global Children's Fund
    This book is designed to do one thing: Create kids who are more comfortable talking about the sexual parts of their body.
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  • Proud Of Me! Activity book for encouraging a sexually healthy child (for boys) | PDF PDF (98 p.)
    by Global Children's Fund
    This book is designed to do one thing: Create kids who are more comfortable talking about the sexual parts of their body.
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  • Do Children Sexually Abuse Other Children? Preventing sexual abuse among children and youth | PDF PDF (10 p.)
    by Stop IT Now (2007)
    This guide is intended for everyone involved in bringing up children. It explains that some children do sexually abuse other children, describes how to recognize the warning signs, and outlines some actions adults can take to prevent sexual abuse.
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  • Talk to your kids...before everyone else does | PDF PDF (44 p.)
    by Children Now and the Kaiser Family Foundation
    This booklet offers practical concrete tips and techniques for talking easily and openly with young children ages 8 to 12 about some tough issues: sex and relationships, HIV/AIDS, violence, drugs and alcohol.
    + View Summary
Human Rights & Peacemaking
A great resource to teach human rights to children is the United Nations Cyber School Bus: Human Rights in Action project which helps students understand the idea of human rights, gain a sense of themselves as people with dignity and hence with rights, and finally encourage them to act. Some additional resources are listed below.
  • ABC - Teaching Human Rights: Practical activities for primary and secondary schools | PDF PDF (1 p.)
    by Office to the United Nations Decade for Human Rights Education (March 2003)
    This guide offers practical advice to teachers and other educators who want to foster human rights awareness and action among primary and secondary school children, including suggestions for developing learning activities.
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  • Human Rights Coloring Book | PDF PDF (26 p.)
    by Peace at Home (1999)
    This coloring book has 32 great pages for children to color and learn about human rights. The text is provided in both English and Spanish. The final page indicates that "everybody has the right to peace at home."
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Teaching Skills to Enhance Safety | Back to top

The resources provided below offer tips and strategies for enhancing safety in situations where children are exposed to violence or are at a greater risk of victimization. These materials deal specifically with violence-related topics – accepting the reality that violence is all around us and offering coping strategies that may reduce risk. Although these can be helpful tools, it is important to stress that they in no way presume that children should be held at all responsible for stopping the violence that is perpetrated against them or their loved ones. Abusers are the only ones who are able to truly stop the violence, and should be held fully accountable for their actions. However, each of us must take personal responsibility for modeling appropriate behavior and consciously working toward the goal of creating a society that does not accept or condone violence against women.

General
  • Teaching the skills of peace | PDF PDF (1 p.)
    by Claudia Miller, Action Alliance for Children
    This article provides examples of elementary and preschools that are going beyond “conflict resolution” to teach positive social behavior to children. Highlights promising programs such as Peace Camps and PeaceBuilders.
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  • Creating Safe Environments: Violence Prevention Strategies and Programs | PDF PDF (46 p.)
    by Patti Culross, Larry Cohen, Ashby Wolfe, Joanne Ruby, Prevention Institute (June 2006)
    Providing a useful overview of the current state of violence prevention in the US, this report discusses approaches to violence prevention with a focus on youth violence and intimate partner violence prevention.
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  • Violence Prevention for Families of Young Children | PDF PDF (19 p.)
    by American Psychological Association & National Association for the Education of Young Children, ACT - Adults and Children Together - Against Violence (2001)
    Designed for parents and caretakers, this booket describes the power of learning in early childhood, suggests principles to teach children that promote violence prevention, and provides skills for anger management and problem solving.
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  • Transforming Communities: Creating Safety and Justice for Women and Girls | PDF PDF (57 p.)
    by Cathy Rath, National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (1999)
    This paper describes the Novato Community Demonstration Project focusing on changing social belief systems; mobilizing Community Action Teams (CAT) to run activism campaigns; an organizer's role; projects implementation; and evaluation process.
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  • Violence Prevention in Early Childhood: How Teachers Can Help | PDF PDF (16 p.)
    by American Psychological Association & National Association for the Education of Young Children, ACT - Adults and Children Together - Against Violence (2002)
    This booklet offers early childhood educators research-based violence prevention information and suggestions for effective ways to help children manage anger, learn self-control, and solve problems peacefully.
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  • Feeling Safe: What Girls Say - Executive Summary | PDF PDF (26 p.)
    by Judy Schoenberg, Toija Riggins & Kimberlee Salmond, Girl Scouts of the USA (2003)
    This report describes the results of a national (online and focus group) study of over 2,000 girls ages 8-17 to explore their definitions of safety, consideration of safe and unsafe situations, quality of life when feeling unsafe, and coping strategies.
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  • When Children Experience Trauma: A Guide for Parents and Families | PDF PDF (7 p.)
    by American Psychological Association, ACT - Adults and Children Together - Against Violence
    This booklet offers strategies for parents and families to lessen the impact of violence and other kinds of trauma. Describes what to expect from children after a traumatic event occurs.
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  • After a Disaster: Helping Young Children Heal | PDF PDF (1 p.)
    by Chandra Ghosh Ippen, Alicia F. Lieberman & Patricia Van Horn, National Child Traumatic Stress Network, Zero to Three (2005)
    This handout describes the impact of disasters on babies, young children, toddlers, and preschoolers, offering many useful tips for helping to promote healing and resiliency.
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Using Media
  • Mind Over Media: Developing healthy relationships | HTML HTML (9 p.)
    by Young Media Australia (July 2004)
    This fact sheet examines the extent and effect of media exposure on infants, toddlers, and preschoolers, particularly in the form of television and computer games.
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  • Parents Guide to Children and Media | HTML HTML (1 p.)
    by PBS
    This resource provides information on television, movies, advertising, computers and video games and how they can shape children's development. Includes tips for creating a media-literate household.
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  • Healthy Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet | HTML HTML (5 p.)
    by The Nemours Foundation (April 2008)
    This resource offers practical ways to make kids' screen time more healthy and productive.
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  • Children and Media: Stereotypes | HTML HTML (2 p.)
    by PBS
    This article suggests seven ways to fight stereotypes often portrayed in the media.
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  • Television and Children | HTML HTML (10 p.)
    by Michigan State University
    This article provides information about television as a presence in kids' lives, discussing its relationship to violence, aggression, fear, trauma, school performance, children's attitudes, gender and minority stereotypes, and various health issues.
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  • A Smart Guide to Kid's TV | HTML HTML (3 p.)
    by American Academy of Pediatrics
    This guide is meant to help parents and caregivers choose healthy television programs for their children.
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On the Internet
* See VAWnet’s special collection on Technology Safety & Advocacy.
  • Growing up Online | HTML HTML (1 p.)
    by Frontline, PBS (2008)
    This video takes viewers inside the very public private worlds that kids are creating online, raising important questions about how the Internet is transforming childhood.
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  • The Net Effect: Girls and New Media - Executive Summary | PDF PDF (21 p.)
    by Whitney Roban, Girl Scouts of the USA (2002)
    This report describes trends in the Internet habits of girls, their skills in navigating potentially difficult or emotional situations online, and advice on how parents and other adults can empower girls to have safe, positive online experiences.
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  • The Internet and Your Family | PDF PDF (2 p.)
    by American Academy of Pediatrics
    This brief article provides information to help teach children the basics of the Internet, including how to keep safe.
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  • Parenting Online | PDF PDF (8 p.)
    by Parry Aftab, Wired Safety (2006)
    This resource guide for parents contains tips on how to talk to your children about online safety, information about kid-friendly search engines and family friendly site, and information about tech tools available to help keep kids safe online.
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  • A Parent's Guide to Internet Safety | HTML HTML (6 p.)
    by Federal Bureau of Investigation (2007)
    This guide is intended to help parents and caregivers begin to understand the complexities of on-line child exploitation.
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  • Parent’s Internet Guide: Searching Wisely and Safely | PDF PDF (16 p.) by Nassau Library System (2001) This booklet was developed to provide tips for using the internet wisely and safely as well as suggestions for beginning dialogue with children about Internet use.
    + View Summary
  • Stay Safe Online | PDF PDF (1 p.)
    by Childnet International
    A poster for parents to print out for their children to use as a mat/poster in front of the computer to remember the 5 SMART rules when using the internet and mobile phones.
    + View Summary
  • Blog Safety: Keeping Up With Your Child's Online Social Life | PDF PDF (10 p.)
    by Childnet International (2006)
    This guide for parents, caregivers and teachers provides information about blogging, social networking, and the importance of parent/caregiver involvement in children's online education and safety.
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  • Social Networking Sites: A Parent's Guide | PDF PDF (4 p.)
    by Federal Trade Commission (2006)
    This document offers tips to parents on how they can talk to their children about social networking sites and using these sites safely.
    + View Summary
  • Child Safety on the Information Highway | HTML HTML (12 p.)
    by Lawrence J. Magid (2005)
    This brochure is geared towards parents and offers information on the benefits and risks of being online and how they can reduce those risks and keep their children safe online.
    + View Summary
  • Online 'Predators' and Their Victims: Myths, Realities, and Implications for Prevention and Treatment | PDF PDF (18 p.)
    by Janis Wolak, David Finkelhor, and Kimberly J. Mitchell, & Michele L. Ybarra, University of New Hampshire, Internet Solutions for Kids, Inc (2008)
    This article summarizes current research on online sexual victimization and compares it to media accounts.
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  • Chat Abbreviations | PDF PDF (13 p.)
    by National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (2007)
    This list of chat abbreviations was designed to test your knowledge of shorthand text commonly used by youth in Instant Messenger and chat rooms.
    + View Summary
At School
For more information about preventing and responding to school violence, see the National Youth Violence Prevention Resource Center's collection of resources on School Violence and Bullying.
  • Expect Respect Program Overview: A School-Based Program for Preventing Teen Dating Violence and Promoting Safe and Healthy Relationships | PDF PDF (32 p.)
    by Barbara Ball and Barri Rosenbluth, SafePlace (2008)
    This document reviews this nationally recognized, school-based program for preventing teen dating violence and promoting safe and healthy relationships in middle and high school.
    + View Summary
  • Respectful Relationships Education: Violence prevention and respectful relationships education in Victorian secondary schools | PDF PDF (89 p.)
    by Michael Flood, Lara Fergus and Melanie Heenan, State of Victoria Department of Education and Early Childhood Development (November 2009)
    The purpose of this report is to identify and explore best practice in violence prevention, intervention and respectful relationships education in schools in Victoria and elsewhere.
    + View Summary
  • Doorways | HTML HTML
    by Safe Schools Program, USAID’s Office of Women in Development (March 2009)
    The Doorways program is a series of manuals targeting three key audiences: teachers, students and community members. These three groups can create a critical mass in schools that will bring about transformative, lasting change.
    + View Summary
  • Preventing Child and Youth Sexual Harassment, Abuse, and Assault: A Resource for Iowa Families | PDF PDF (42 p.)
    by Iowa Department of Education in conjunction with the Iowa Collaboration for Youth Development (August 2006)
    This document has been formatted so that families, community groups, and schools can use each section as a separate handout or use them all together as one complete document.
    + View Summary
  • Creating Schoolwide Prevention and Intervention Strategies | PDF PDF (55 p.)
    by Jeffrey Sprague, Ph.D., Institute on Violence and Destructive Behavior, University of Oregon, The Hamilton Fish Institute on School and Community Violence & Northwest Regional Educational Lab (Revised September 2007)
    This guide is intended to put the issue of schoolwide violence prevention in context for educators and outline an approach for choosing and creating effective prevention programs.
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  • A Guide to Addressing Teen Dating and Sexual Violence in a School Setting | PDF PDF (22 p.)
    by Peace Over Violence (February 2008)
    This guide is intended to help school personnel develop or strengthen a school-wide plan to prevent and respond to teen dating and sexual violence.
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  • School Safety | HTML HTML (2 p.)
    by National Crime Prevention Council
    This brief article describes specific ways that parents can make going to school a safer and more valuable learning experience for their children.
    + View Summary
  • Help Make Your Child's School Safer | HTML HTML (1 p.)
    by Choose Respect Initiative
    This tip sheet lists suggestions for parents who want to help create safer schools for children, originally from the Department of Education's 1998 publication, Early Warning, Timely Response.
    + View Summary
  • Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Youth: Recommendations for Schools | HTML HTML (5 p.)
    by Jody Marksamer and Dylan Vade, The Transgender Law Center
    Transgender students face severe discrimination and harassment in schools. This manual addresses problems ranging from lack of gender-neutral bathrooms to confidentiality, with specific recommendations for addressing each problem in a school setting.
    + View Summary
  • Sexual Harassment at School: More Harmful than Bullying | HTML HTML (2 p.)
    by Science News (2008)
    This brief news article talks about new research demonstrating that sexual harassment, although less frequent, has a greater negative impact on teenagers' health than the more common form of victimization, bullying.
    + View Summary
  • Right from the Start: Guidelines for Sexuality Issues, Birth to Five Years | PDF PDF (76 p.)
    by Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States (SIECUS) (1998)
    These guidelines were developed as a resource for caregivers in childcare centers and preschools who are challenged with the many complicated issues concerning early childhood sexuality.
    + View Summary
  • The Effectiveness of Universal School-Based Programs for the Prevention of Violent and Aggressive Behavior | PDF PDF (16 p.)
    by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (August 2007)
    This report provides a summary of findings from a review of evidence concerning the effectiveness of universal school-based violence prevention programs.
    + View Summary
In the Community
  • The Violence Around Me | HTML HTML (3 p.)
    by Instituto Promundo, Futures Without Violence
    This exercise is used to critically discuss the violence that we see in daily life, including what happens in the street, in our homes, school, workplace and in the media.
    + View Summary
  • Keep Children Safe: A program to Help Children Cope with Community Violence | PDF PDF (65 p.)
    by Annette M. La Greca, Lissettle Perez, & Alissa Glickman, University of Miami, Department of Psychology (2002)
    This manual was designed for teachers and mental health professionals working with school children who may have been exposed to community violence.
    + View Summary
  • Tips for Parents - Things to consider to protect your children | PDF PDF (1 p.)
    by Kids Need to Know Foundation, Inc.
    This one-page article raises important questions and considerations for parents when signing their children up for a community program (day care, camp, church, summer programs, sports).
    + View Summary
  • Neighborhood Safety | HTML HTML (6 p.)
    by National Crime Prevention Council
    This page offers a variety of useful resources for enhancing safety for children in their neighborhood.
    + View Summary
  • Domestic Violence Prevention & Education in Faith-Based Communities | HTML HTML
    by National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (2004)
    This collection highlights resources developed to aid in prevention initiatives within communities of faith. Included are several educational articles, sample campaign materials, bulletin inserts, sermons, ceremonies, and other worship materials.
    + View Summary
About Sexual Violence
  • Step Up and Speak Out: A Parent Guide for Selecting Youth Serving Organizations | HTML HTML
    by Darkness to Light (August 2007)
    This slideshow presentation with audio is a guide that teaches parents about their personal power and responsibility to protect children from sexual abuse.
    + View Summary
  • A Parents Guide to Sexual Abuse Prevention | PDF PDF (135 p.)
    by Global Children's Fund
    This guide is part of a sexual abuse prevention series designed to prevent non-parental sexual abuse.
    + View Summary
  • A Place to Start: A Resource Kit for Preventing Sexual Violence | HTML HTML
    by Sexual Violence Prevention Program of the Minnesota Department of Health
    Provides definitions and some scope of the problem of sexual violence in MN including prevalence and costs, and protective and risk factors. It offers many sample prevention ideas and tools for various communities, population groups, and service providers.
    + View Summary
  • Keeping Children Safe | PDF PDF (26 p.)
    by Olive Crest Homes & Services for Abused Children
    This handbook provides information, education, and guidance to those who want to join the fight against child abuse, as well as those who may need to receive services or support to help stop the cycle of abuse within their own lives and family circles.
    + View Summary
  • Families are Talking: Keeping Kids Sexually Safe | PDF PDF (4 p.)
    by Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States (SIECUS) (2004)
    This newsletter provides useful information for parents and caregivers when teaching their children the difference between "good" and "bad" touch and how to set boundaries to their own bodies.
    + View Summary
  • Protecting children from sexual abuse: A guide for parents and carers | PDF PDF (14 p.)
    by The National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) (Revised 2008)
    This booklet gives simple information and advice to help keep children safe from sexual abuse.
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  • Prevention and Intervention of Sexual Violence in Schools: Talking about “It” | PDF PDF (27 p.)
    by Cordelia Anderson, Ramsey County
    An educational booklet that provides information on sexual violence among school aged youth.
    + View Summary
  • Do Children Sexually Abuse Other Children? Preventing sexual abuse among children and youth | PDF PDF (10 p.)
    by Stop IT Now (2007)
    This guide is intended for everyone involved in bringing up children. It explains that some children do sexually abuse other children, describes how to recognize the warning signs, and outlines some actions adults can take to prevent sexual abuse.
    + View Summary
  • The Secret of the Silver Horse |HTML HTML (6 p.)
    by Canadian Department of Justice (Updated 2005)
    This resource is an online picture book where children are shown the difference between a good secret and a secret about sexual abuse.
    + View Summary
About Domestic Violence
  • Connect: Supporting Children Exposed to Domestic Violence - In-service Training for Resource Families, a Trainer's Guide and Tools | HTML HTML (1 p.)
    by Denise Goodman, Futures Without Violence (2009)
    This curriculum, PPT presentation and related tools are intended for use in child welfare settings with foster parents, kin caregivers, and adoptive parents with all levels of experience in caring for children who have been exposed to domestic violence.
    + View Summary
  • Expect Respect: A School-Based Program Promoting Safe and Healthy Relationships | PDF PDF (85 p.)
    by Barri Rosenbluth, National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (2002)
    This document examines the issues of dating violence, sexual harassment and bullying, their interrelationship, and offers a rationale for school-based programs.
    + View Summary
  • Kid&TeenSAFE: An Abuse Prevention Program for Youth with Disabilities | PDF PDF (65 p.)
    by Wendie H. Abramson and Iracema 'Cema' Mastroleo, National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (2002)
    This publication details a project of SafePlace's Disability Services ASAP (A Safety Awareness Program) in Texas and provides its model program materials for use with youth with disabilities.
    + View Summary
  • Making the Peace: An Approach to Preventing Relationship Violence Among Youth | PDF PDF (81 p.)
    by Allan Creighton, TODOS Institute/Oakland Men's Project, National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (May 2000)
    Describes a comprehensive school-based project that provided training and technical assistance to 2 communities implementing comprehensive dating/domestic violence prevention campaigns in their secondary schools.
    + View Summary
  • Relationship Abuse Prevention Program (RAPP) | PDF PDF (2 p.)
    by Center Against Domestic Violence, Office of Domestic Violence and Emergency Intervention Services, Department of Social Services of the Human Resources Administration, City of New York (2005)
    This school-based domestic violence prevention curriculum teaches students to recognize and prevent teen relationship abuse. Lesson plans include a variety of exercises. Parent workshop information and school staff development materials are also included.
    + View Summary
  • Prevention/Promotion Program Theory | PDF PDF (7 p.)
    by Peer Solutions (May 2004)
    This document describes the theories that drive Peer Solutions' teen interpersonal violence prevention program, Demonstrating Respect as the Norm, which strives to unite elementary through post-secondary schools, families and communities.
    + View Summary
  • Tough Talk: What boys need to know about relationship abuse | PDF PDF (7 p.)
    by Liz Claiborne Inc.
    Created to help men start a conversation with the boys in their lives about developing and maintaining positive relationships, this booklet defines abuse, provides practical guidelines and tips for starting a dialogue, and lists additional resources.
    + View Summary
  • Connect Magazine | HTML HTML (1 p.)
    by Futures Without Violence
    Connect is a resource to engage kids in discussions about violence against women. Issue 2 contains information for foster parents and kin on meeting the needs of children who have been exposed to domestic violence and are in the child welfare system.
    + View Summary

Community & Organizational Tools to Promote Children's Safety and Well Being | Back to top

While several of the other sections look at how parents, teachers and caregivers can protect children at home, school and in the community, this section looks at strategies, policies and roles that organizations and communities can play in keeping children safe.

  • Something is Wrong: Exploring the Roots of Youth Violence | PDF PDF (382 p.)
    by Edited by Mariame Kaba, J. Cyriac Mathew, and Nathan Haines, Project NIA, the Chicago Freedom School, and Teachers for Social Justice (February 2010)
    This guide discusses the roots of violence the lives of youth, the enforcers and victims of violence, the effects of violence on both victims and perpetrators, and how violence can ultimately be minimized through systemic changes.
    + View Summary
  • Doorways | HTML HTML
    by Safe Schools Program, USAID’s Office of Women in Development (March 2009)
    The Doorways program is a series of manuals targeting three key audiences: teachers, students and community members. These three groups can create a critical mass in schools that will bring about transformative, lasting change.
    + View Summary
  • Transforming Communities to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation: A Primary Prevention Approach | PDF PDF (20 p.)
    by Annie Lyles, Larry Cohen, & Margot Brown, Prevention Institute (May 2009)
    This brief is designed for advocates, practitioners, government officials, and funders who are interested in transforming broad social norms and our communities in order to prevent child sexual abuse and exploitation before it occurs.
    + View Summary
  • Moving From Them to Us: Challenges in Reframing Violence Among Youth | PDF PDF (27 p.)
    by Prevention Institute (October 2009)
    This paper explores how youth and violence have been framed in the media, how the issue of race complicates depictions of youth and violence, and how public attitudes about government can inhibit public support for effective prevention strategies.
    + View Summary
  • First Steps: Taking Action Early To Prevent Violence | HTML HTML (83 p.)
    by Prevention Institute (2002)
    The First Steps report synthesizes research, presents best practices, and offers a comprehensive strategy to inform violence prevention efforts targeted at the 0-5 population.
    + View Summary
  • Promoting Healthy Families in Your Community: 2008 Resource Packet | PDF PDF (68 p.)
    by Child Welfare Information Gateway, Children's Bureau, FRIENDS National Resource Center For Community (2008)
    This resource packet was created specifically for service providers who work with parents, other caregivers, and their children with the common goal of promoting healthy families.
    + View Summary
  • Guidelines for Programs to Reduce Child Victimization: A resource for communities when choosing a program to teach personal safety to children | PDF PDF (20 p.)
    by The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC)
    These guidelines detail the recommendations from NCMEC's Education Standards Task Force for communities when choosing programs to teach personal safety to children.
    + View Summary
  • Child Abuse in Community Institutions and Organizations: Improving Public and Professional Understanding | PDF PDF (27 p.)
    by David A. Wolfe, Peter G. Jaffe, Jennifer L. Jette, Samantha E. Poisson, Law Commission of Canada (September 2001)
    This paper seeks to define child abuse in organizations and institutions such as schools, churches, and residential facilities, and discusses the effect that abuse has on the children involved.
    + View Summary
  • Preventing Child Sexual Abuse within Youth-serving Organizations: Getting Started on Policies and Procedures | PDF PDF (55 p.)
    by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2007)
    This report is designed for representatives of youth-serving organizations who are interested in adopting strategies to prevent child sexual abuse.
    + View Summary
  • Staff Screening Tool Kit, 3rd Edition | PDF PDF (132 p.)
    by John C. Patterson, The Nonprofit Risk Management Center (2004)
    A framework for deciding on screening standards and requirements for new staff in organizations, this guide is for selecting the right person while examining any threats to service recipients, other staff members, or the organization itself.
    + View Summary

Additional Resources | Back to top

The resources listed here include organizations, websites, programs, initiatives, and resource lists for more information about working with children to promote positive attitudes and behaviors that may help prevent violence against women. These lists are not comprehansive - rather, they offer a starting point for your research. If you have suggested additions, you are welcome to contact VAWnet staff using our Online Contact Form.

Organizations

Advocates for Youth
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/
Advocates for Youth champions efforts to help young people make informed and responsible decisions about their reproductive and sexual health. Advocates believes it can best serve the field by boldly advocating for a more positive and realistic approach to adolescent sexual health.

Break the Cycle
http://www.breakthecycle.org/
Break the Cycle engages, educates and empowers youth to build lives and communities free from domestic and dating violence. Break the Cycle offers programs that ensure that no young person is excluded from receiving the help, tools and information they need to live free from violence. Success is demonstrated by more than a decade of leadership, working with teens to prevent and end domestic and dating violence.

Dads & Daughters
http://www.dadsanddaughters.org/home/index.html
Created by men with daughters, Dads & Daughters improves the lives of fathers, daughters, and their families with outstanding resources supporting fathers' and stepfathers' positive involvement in girls' lives and advocacy for girls' well-being.

National Youth Violence Prevention Resource Center
http://safeyouth.org/scripts/about/index.asp
First, since its establishment, the NYVPRC has grown into a recognizable, clearinghouse-like resource with a constituent base of parents and other caregivers, teens, educators, community development professionals, law enforcement, the media, and many other categories of professionals working with youth in communities across the nation.

Partners for Violence Prevention
http://www.partnersforviolenceprevention.org/
The mission of Partners for Violence Prevention is to promote peace, reduce the incidence and impact of violence, and build the capacity for violence prevention in the community. PVP reaches approximately 7200 students each year through its partnerships with St. Paul schools.

Peace Games
http://www.peacegames.org/
Peace Games imagines a world where every child has the skills, knowledge, supportive relationships, and opportunities to prevent violence and build safer communities. A world where individuals and institutions believe in the power of young people and that violence - in all of its forms - can be prevented. Peace Games believes that this goal is best achieved by building the capacity of schools and community groups to implement holistic, peace and justice education programs.

SafePlace, Austin, TX
http://www.austin-safeplace.org/
SafePlace helps those who have been hurt by sexual and domestic violence and abuse to heal and empower themselves. They provide prevention, intervention, education and advocacy so that women, children, and men may lead safe and healthy lives. SafePlace coordinates the Expect Respect program - a comprehensive school based education program and A.S.A.P.--a program for students with disabilities.

Safe Schools Coalition
http://www.safeschoolscoalition.org/
The Safe Schools Coalition is an international public-private partnership in support of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender youth, that is working to help schools - at home and all over the world - become safe places where every family can belong, where every educator can teach, and where every child can learn, regardless of gender identity or sexual orientation.

Zero to Three
http://www.zerotothree.org/site/PageServer
ZERO TO THREE's mission is to support the healthy development and well-being of infants, toddlers and their families. We are a national nonprofit multidisciplinary organization that advances our mission by informing, educating and supporting adults who influence the lives of infants and toddlers.

Websites

Bursting the Bubble
http://www.burstingthebubble.com/
This is a website for youth who are living with family violence - witnessing domestic violence, experiencing physical or sexual abuse or neglect. It provides information to help young people identify forms of abuse and violence in families, stories, answers to questions about telling professionals or child protection, ideas on dealing with feelings, safety planning, services available, and how to help a friend.

GetNetWise  
http://www.getnetwise.org 
A resource to help kids have safe, educational, and entertaining online experiences. Includes a glossary, a guide and tools for online safety, directions for reporting online trouble, and sites for kids to visit.

By Girls for Girls
http://www.bygirlsforgirls.org/
This website was designed by teen girls who participated in the Smith College Summer Science and Engineering Program. The site offers information on self image, both healthy and abusive relationships, gender roles, health and safety.

Girl Scouts of the USA
http://www.girlscouts.org/
Girl Scouts of the USA is the world's preeminent organization dedicated solely to girls--all girls--where, in an accepting and nurturing environment, girls build character and skills for success in the real world. In partnership with committed adult volunteers, girls develop qualities that will serve them all their lives, like leadership, strong values, social conscience, and conviction about their own potential and self-worth.

Kids Health
http://www.kidshealth.org
KidsHealth provides doctor-approved health information about children from before birth through adolescence. The site has separate areas for kids, teens, and parents - each with its own design, age-appropriate content, and tone. There are thousands of in-depth features, articles, animations, games, and resources - all original and all developed by experts in the health of children and teens.

Love is Not Abuse
http://www.loveisnotabuse.com/
Part of Liz Claiborne Inc.'s campaign to end domestic violence, this website provides information and tools that men, women, children, teens and others can use to learn more about the issue and find out how to be part of the solution. Resources include booklets for parents and teens.

National Sex Offender Public Registry
http://www.nsopr.gov

Database that links individual state sex offender registries across the U.S., providing the names, locations, and pictures of convicted sex offenders. Users can search by specific name in multiple states, by city, or by ZIP code.

PBS Parents Guide to Understanding and Raising Boys
http://www.pbs.org/parents/raisingboys/about.html
The PBS Parents Guide to Understanding and Raising Boys delivers practical strategies and useful insights to help parents understand and raise their sons. Sections of this website include "The Search for Masculinity" and "Emotionally Strong Boys."

Peer Solutions
http://www.peersolutions.org/
Peer Solutions is an Arizona-based organization established in 1996 to promote healthy communities while actively addressing the underlying causes of harmful behaviors. Their mission is to cultivate positive social change by uniting schools, families and communities with STAND & SERVE (S&S), an asset based, peer facilitated, prevention and intervention support program fostering peace, respect, empathy and ownership of the solution.

Protect Kids
http://www.protectkids.com/
Offers resources for parents, educators, and policy makers on protecting children from online dangers.

The Date Safe Project
http://www.thedatesafeproject.org/
The Date Safe Project provides strong and positive voices for discussing sexual assault awareness, healthy dating, and specifically addressing consent. It provides students, educators, schools, and communities with interactive keynote presentations, workshops, books, and educational resources that are filled with fun exercises, thought-provoking lessons, emotionally touching stories, and easy to implement concepts.  Parents are given simple solutions to talk with their kids about tough questions regarding dating and sexual assault awareness.

Safe Surfing with Doug
http://www.disney.co.uk/DisneyOnline/Safesurfing/index.html
This web site, created by Disney, provides a space for children to learn about safe web surfing in an interactive and fun way. Also includes a parents guide to Safe Surfing.

Think U Know
http://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/
This website is designed for kids to teach them about safe ways to use the Internet while being aware of potential dangers. Includes information on how to have fun, how to stay safe, and how to report suspicions of danger for three age groups: 5-7. 8-10, and 11-16.

Toolkit: Working with Men and Boys to Prevent Gender-Based Violence
http://toolkit.endabuse.org/Home.html
This web site is a comprehensive tool kit designed to help you work with men and boys to prevent gender-based violence. It provides readings, case studies, handouts, exercises, and other resources as well as community-building tools.

United Nations Cyber School Bus: Human Rights in Action
http://www.un.org/cyberschoolbus/humanrights/index.asp
This project helps students understand the idea of human rights, gain a sense of themselves as people with dignity and hence with rights, and finally encourage them to act.

Youth Resource
http://www.youthresource.com/
This website, a project of Advocates for Youth, is by and for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (GLBTQ) young people, taking a holistic approach to sexual health and exploring issues of concern to GLBTQ youth.

Programs/Initiatives

ACT - Adults and Children Together - Against Violence
http://actagainstviolence.apa.org/
ACT - Adults and Children Together - Against Violence is a national universal violence prevention program that focuses on adults who raise, care, and teach children ages 0 to 8 years old. The program accomplishes its mission - to educate communities and adults to create safe, healthy environments that protects children and youth from violence - by disseminating research-based information and skills to adults in simple, accessible, user-friendly messages and materials.

Choose Respect
http://www.chooserespect.org/
Choose Respect is an initiative to help adolescents form healthy relationships to prevent dating abuse before it starts. This national effort is designed to motivate adolescents to challenge harmful beliefs about dating abuse and take steps to form respectful relationships.

Coaching Boys Into Men
http://www.endabuse.org/cbim/
Coaching Men into Boys, a national campaign launched in 2002, provides information to help men learn appropriate ways to talk to boys about violence against women and girls. The campaign invites men to be part of the solution, while educating them about the problem, motivating them to move beyond complacency and providing them with the tools and information necessary to break the cycle of intimate partner and family violence.

The Fourth R: Relationship Based Violence Prevention
http://thefourthr.ca/index.html
Fourth R initiatives use best practice approaches to target multiple forms of violence, including bullying, dating violence, peer violence, and group violence. By building healthy school environments we provide opportunities to engage students in developing healthy relationships and decision-making to provide a solid foundation for their learning experience. Increasing youth relationship skills and targeting risk behaviour with a harm reduction approach empowers adolescents to make healthier decisions about relationships, substance use and sexual behaviour.

GenderYOUTH Network
http://www.gpac.org/youth/
A project of the Gender Public Advocacy Coalition, the GenderYOUTH Network empowers youth leaders to build safer classrooms and communities where all youth can learn, grow and succeed, whether or not they conform to expectations for masculinity and femininity.

Hands & Words Are Not For Hurting
http://www.handsproject.org/home.html
This project is designed to work in partnership with all violence prevention, conflict resolution and character building skills programs. The Purple Hands together with the Hands Pledge are the visual and verbal reminders that reinforce a personal commitment of nonviolence. In addition to reaching schools, the HANDS Project has expanded to include government agencies, the business community, places of worship, battered women's shelters, homeless shelters, correctional facilities, day care centers and birthing centers for parents of newborns.

MyStrength
http://www.mystrength.org/
The MyStrength campaign centers on the theme of "My Strength is Not for Hurting," and is designed to raise awareness of sexual violence among youth and highlight the vital role that young men can play in fostering healthy, safe relationships.

Partnership to Address Violence through Education (PAVE)
http://cehd.umn.edu/ceed/projects/pave/
Pave created a unique violence prevention and intervention training process for early childhood educators. Staff and consultants of the Center for Early Education and Development (CEED) use the PAVE principles and strategies in conference presentations, university courses, and trainings throughout Minnesota. CEED staff and consultants are available to present workshops and conference presentations on infant mental health and related topics.

The Quiet Storm Project
http://www.thequietstormproject.com
The QUIET Storm Project focuses on the prevention of relationship violence for youth. The project is designed for students in grades 5 through 12 and for students who are in college. The project integrates easily into lesson plans and can be used as a stand-alone domestic violence prevention learning module or it can integrate into an existing domestic violence prevention curriculum. Project collaboration consists of 6 non-profit domestic violence organizations located in Minnesota.

Safe Communities ~ Safe Schools (SCSS)
http://www.colorado.edu/cspv/safeschools/index.html
In an effort to address the immediate concerns of the Colorado education community, the Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence (CSPV) of the University of Colorado, introduced the Safe Communities~Safe Schools Initiative in the fall of 1999.

Too Good for Violence
http://www.mendezfoundation.org/educationcenter/app/
Too Good for Violence K-8 is a school-based prevention program that uses the same research, theories, strategies and format that propelled Too Good for Drugs to national prominence, including Model Program designation from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Too Good for Violence K-8 addresses the most significant risk and protective factors at each developmental level to help students learn the skills and attitudes they need to get along peacefully with others.

Vision of Hope
http://www.theirhope.org/
Vision of Hope is a campaign aimed at protecting our children from the devastation of sexual abuse. Nationally, Vision of Hope will promote: critical research, effective prevention strategies, and adult responsibility and accountability.

Resource Lists: Curricula, Books, & Tools

Boys Will Be Men: Books for Boys to Read
http://toolkit.endabuse.org/Resources/BoysBooks/FVPFResource_viewccb4.html?searchterm=None
This list of recommended novels and readings for young men was developed by the Futures Without Violence.

Boys Will Be Men: Videography
http://toolkit.endabuse.org/Resources/BoysVideography/FVPFResource_viewccb4.html?searchterm=None
This list of suggested videos to watch and discuss with young men was developed by the Futures Without Violence. These films can raise questions for young men about their own roles and the choices they face.

Curricula for Elementary Age and Younger
http://www.preventconnect.org/wiki/index.php?title=Curricula_for_Elementary_Age_and_Under
Part of Prevention Connection's Wiki Project, this fairly comprehensive list includes curricula for elementary age children and younger to prevent violence against women.

Prevention Programs AddressingYouth Dating Violence
http://www.ucalgary.ca/resolve/violenceprevention/English/reviewprog/youthdprogs.htm
Developed by the University of Calgary, this list is part of their Resource Manual on school-based violence prevention programs.

Resources for Gender Variant Children and Trans-Identified and Questioning Youth and Their Allies
http://www.safeschoolscoalition.org/RG-gender_nonconforming_trans_youth.html
Includes videos, links, handbooks, action kits, manuals, books and more from the Safe Schools Coalition.

Resources for Parents & Caregivers
http://www.jimhopper.com/abstats/#res1
Includes a list of books and video recommendations for parents and caregivers of children who have been abused.

A Sampler of Peacemaking Books to Share With Your Children
http://www.peacegames.org/Resources_recommended_reading.shtml
Compiled by Peace Games, this is a sample list of books that celebrate diversity, friendship, respect and peacemaking.

Virginia Best Practices in School-Based Violence Prevention
http://www.pubinfo.vcu.edu/vabp/best_practice_listsGo.asp?eid=2
This is a list of top ten prevention programs complied by the Virginia Department of Health.

  • Preventing Child Sexual Abuse: A National Resource Directory and Handbook | PDF PDF (20 p.)
    by National Sexual Violence Resource Center (2005)
    This is a collection of currently available resources and initiatives related to child sexual abuse prevention. The handbook provides descriptions of organizations, programs, projects and a wide range of resources.
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  • Emerging Responses to Children Exposed to Domestic Violence | PDF PDF (14 p.) HTML HTML
    by Jeffrey Edleson In consultation with Barbara Nissley, VAWnet: The National Online Resource Center on Violence Against Women (October 2006)
    This document reviews the new research, policies, and programs focused on children who have witnessed adult domestic violence. It argues that the diversity of children’s experiences requires equally diverse responses from those who serve them.
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  • Problems Associated with Children's Witnessing of Domestic Violence | PDF PDF (8 p.) HTML HTML
    by Jeffrey L. Edleson, VAWnet: The National Online Resource Center on Violence Against Women (Revised April 1999)
    Discusses children's problems associated with exposure and factors that influence the degree of those problems. The author offers a critique of the research methods used to study child witnessing and explores policy implications of the data on this issue.
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  • Long-Term Effects of Childhood Sexual Abuse | PDF PDF (16 p.)
    by The Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs (April 2008)
    This digest includes research articles and a featured interview that explore the long-term effects of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) to adult survivor well being and functionality.
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  • Facts for Families: Child Sexual Abuse | HTML HTML (3 p.)
    by American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Updated May 2008)
    This article talks about the emotional and psychological damage of child sexual abuse and how that can be devastating to a child.
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  • Treating Adolescent Survivors of Sexual Abuse | HTML HTML (12 p.)
    by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families, At Health (2007)
    The article discusses child sexual abuse and the impact it has on adolescent development.
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  • Sexual Harassment at School: More Harmful than Bullying | HTML HTML (2 p.)
    by Science News (2008)
    This brief news article talks about new research demonstrating that sexual harassment, although less frequent, has a greater negative impact on teenagers' health than the more common form of victimization, bullying.
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  • The Relationship of Adverse Childhood Experiences to Adult Health: Turning Gold Into Lead | PDF PDF (8 p.)
    by Vincent J. Felitti, MD (2002)
    Overview of results from the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study. 2 important findings are that "adverse childhood experiences are vastly more common than recognized or acknowledged and have a powerful relation to adult health a half-century later."
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  • Children’s Exposure to Violence: A Comprehensive National Survey | PDF PDF (12 p.)
    by David Finkelhor, Heather Turner, Richard Ormrod, Sherry Hamby, and Kristen Kracke, U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs (October 2009)
    This Bulletin discusses survey findings regarding children’s direct and indirect exposure to specific categories of violence, how exposure changes as children grow up, and the prevalence and incidence of multiple and cumulative exposures to violence.
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